I could tell you how many steps make up the streets rising like stairways, and of the degree of the arcades' curves, and what kind of zinc scales cover the roofs; but I already know this would be the same as telling you nothing. The city does not consist of this, but of relationships between the measurements of its space and the events of its past...A description of Zaira as it is today should contain all Zaira's past. -Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities

Tuesday, May 10, 2005

Flat World

One of the next books on my list is Thomas Friedman's The World is Flat: A Brief History of the 21st Century. Friedman is a columnist with the New York Times who spent a lot of time last year in Bangalore. I read his columns while he was there, and some excerpts from the book. His overall thesis seems to be that since there are intelligent, skilled people throughout the world, and broadband has made global interconnectedness real, the skills needed to do almost any work can be found anywhere, and employed from anywhere.

There is a message for those of us in the US about education and skill training, but I also think there are some exciting possibilities. Rather than worry about how jobs might go overseas, I like thinking about how we work collaboratively with colleagues around the world. For the last year, I have been working on a project with Dina Mehta of Explore Research and Consultancy in India. The flatness of the world has enabled my company to conduct a long term research project in another country, combining Explore's cultural knowledge and our knowledge of our business (and a bit of outsider view into Indian culture and workpractice doesn't hurt either).

3 comments:

Charu said...

Hi Alex! flat world indeed - not to mention really small... I came here thru Dina's blog...

Anonymous said...

the world is
flat thomas friedman

Alex said...

Hmm...most of the recommended books are either on my nightstand or are planned purchases...