Skip to main content

Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference

The call for submissions for the 1st Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference (EPIC) has just gone out. Here is the info:

Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference (EPIC)
November 14-15, 2005
Microsoft Corporation Conference Center
Redmond, WA

Introducing the Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference (EPIC). This conference aims to bring together people who are actively thinking about the theoretical and methodological development of ethnography in industry practice. We want to draw participants who are both working in industry, as well as those who consult or collaborate with industry. We are aiming to create a collaborative venue where those practicing their ethnographic training in the corporate setting can benefit from mutual support and sharing information.

The theme for this year's conference looks at understanding "sociality" from an ethnographic perspective as applied to industry. The collective nature of humans is often over looked in much of the research by industry. Ethnographic understandings, however, frequently point to the importance of the collective nature of people. We will be seeking papers that address methods, theory and innovative practices around the theme of sociality, as well as workshops of interest to the community. Call for paper abstracts is open until is June 17, 2005 and the call for posters is open until September 1, 2005.

Registration
This conference will be limited to 200 people and participation will be on a first come, first serve basis beyond the accepted papers. The registration link can be reached via the website http://www.epic2005.com, or can be reached directly through https://secure.aaanet.org/epic/. Special thanks to AAA for sponsoring registration.

Conference Fees:
General - $100
NAPA members - $75 (National Association of Practicing Anthropology)
Students - $50

Further information can be found at:
http://www.epic2005.com

Sincerely,
ken anderson & Tracey Lovejoy (co-organizers)
ken.anderson@Intel.com & traceylo@microsoft.com
Advisory Council: Jeanette Blomberg, Alexandra Mack, Rick Robinson, Nina Wakeford, Christina Wasson
This year's conference is jointly sponsored by: Intel & Microsoft

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Anthropology and advertising?

I read an interesting article on trend forecasting today. I've always found this fascinating (and wonder how much anybody checks later to see if the forecasters were right). The only thing that bothered me about this one, and this is not new, is the claim that what they do is like cultural anthropology. This is not a diss on advertising, marketing, trend forecasting, or any of the other fields that claim to be like anthropology--these folks to interesting work.

I am just annoyed at the claim itself. Granted, we anthropologists are not always good at advertising ourselves...in that we offer a holistic approach, and theoretical insight based on our training. So anybody who observes people is now an anthropologist. Or is it just that Americans are so used to sound bites that they don't understand the nuanced differences in anything?

Sigh.

Kids Day and India

Last Friday was bring your kid to work day at Pitney Bowes. It's all very fun, begins with breakfast and a magic show, followed by tours for the older kids, then a big outdoor picnic. I was a tour stop, "Let's Travel to India." They put the kids in groups by age, since some of the stops are better for older or younger ones...I ended up with groups ranging from about 8-13 years old. It was fun but exhausting.

I figured the point was more fun than educational, so pretty much I set up a slide show to talk about the fact that we invent stuff by understanding how people live and work, and asking what they knew about India. Answers: lots of people, cows...Showed them pics of cellphones, malls and offices and lots of things that look pretty similar in India as in the US, then pictures of things that look different. Fun to see their reactions. They all noticed the Subway in the mall, and they all recognized the well in the village and understood what it was for and that…

Tweets and Yams

I originally signed up for Twitter (@lxmack) a while ago, but didn't really do anything with it--no tweets, no followers. Then had a couple of friends sign up to follow me...still didn't do anything. A few weeks ago I thought that I should give it more of a try...and I have to admit that I still don't get it.
I suppose I could come up with plenty of things to tweet about (the process of buying a new washer, the mystery of the blood in the house) but it seems time consuming and I am not sure who wants to know. My colleague John Braun very kindly encouraged me and gave some great advice, the most intriguing of which was his comment that Twitter can act like a group brain--ask a question and get an immediate answer.
On the flip side, I joined Yammer about the same time I tried to get active on Twitter. Best quick explanation of Yammer is that it's like Twitter for inside a company (you have to have a valid email address on your corporate domain), without the 14o character…